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Drug Treatment in Aurora, Illinois

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that the main driver of overdose deaths in the United States are opioids, both prescription and illicit. In 2016, there were 42,249 opioid-involved deaths, and overdose deaths involving these drugs increased by five times in 2016 than 1999.

From 2015 to 2016, there were significant increases in the rate of drug overdose deaths in many states, including Illinois.

Heroin, prescription opioids and synthetic opioids are major contributors of overdose deaths across the nation. According to the CDC, 40% of all overdose deaths caused by opioids in the United States are reported to involve a prescription opioid.

In 2016, over 46 prescription opioid overdose deaths occurred each day. The most common drugs involved in deaths from prescription opioid overdose include oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone. In 2014, nearly 2 million people in the country were dependent on or abused prescription opioids. More than 1,000 people who are treated in emergency departments for the misuse of prescription opioids.  

In recent years, heroin use has been increasing among most age groups, men and women, and all income levels. As the use of the drug has increased, there has also been an increase in heroin-related overdose deaths. Overdose deaths involving heroin have risen by more than 4 times since 2010.

From 2014 to 2015, the rate of heroin overdose deaths increased by 20.6%, with close to 13,000 people dying in 2015. From 2014 to 2015, deaths caused by synthetic opioids other than methadone, including fentanyl and tramadol, increased by 72.2%.

Aurora Recovery, The Recover
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If you live in Aurora and have fallen victim to substance abuse don’t hesitate to seek treatment. There are enormous resources in at your disposal.

Risk Factors of Heroin Abuse

Misusing prescription in the past is the strongest risk factor for starting use of heroin – this is especially true of people who abused or became dependent on prescription opioids in the past year. This indicates that transitioning from non-medical use of prescription opioids to heroin use may contribute to the progression to addiction.

More than 9 in 10 people who used heroin reported that they also used at least one other drug. Among new heroin users, roughly 3 out of 4 reported that they have abused prescription opioids prior to using heroin.

Increased availability, high purity and relatively low price of heroin in the United States have been identified as potential factors in the increasing heroin use rate. Data from the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reported that during 2000 to 2008, the amounts of heroin confiscated at the US southwest border each year were approximately 500 kg. This number increased by 4 times to 2,196 kg in 2013.

Each year, more than 5,500 people in Illinois die, and of those, over 5% are related, directly or indirectly, to the use of alcohol or other substances. Accidental injuries kill between 9,000 to 10,000 people in the state each year. Approximately 40% of these deaths involve the use of alcohol.

Opioid Abuse and Addiction

Whether you are addicted to prescription opioids or heroin, it is important to get the right treatment at a well-known drug treatment center or rehab in Aurora, Illinois. There are a number of different types of treatment programs to choose from, and it is important that you choose the right one.

Keep in mind that there is no treatment program or plan that works the same for each and every one. Each user has different needs and issues and the treatment plan they choose should be designed to address those needs and issues.

Physical signs of opiate abuse include:

  • Noticeable euphoria/elation
  • Marked drowsiness/sedation
  • Constricted pupil
  • Confusion
  • Slowed breathing
  • Loss of consciousness or intermittent nodding off
  • Constipation

Other signs include:

  • Doctor shopping, i.e., obtaining multiple prescriptions from different doctors
  • Extra pill bottles in the trash
  • Dramatically changing or shifting moods
  • Isolation/social withdrawal
  • Sudden financial problems

Withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headache
  • Sweating
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Inability to sleep

Treatment for Opioid/Heroin Abuse and Addiction

 

Before you enter a drug treatment facility, there are certain processes you need to go through to make sure that you find the right one. It is important to find a program that works for you so that your chances of recovering successfully are increased and you can begin rebuilding your life without addiction.

Before entering a drug treatment center, it is essential to determine if you have any co-occurring disorders. There are a number of disorders or conditions that can co-occur with addiction to opioids or heroin. The most common co-occurring disorder with any substance abuse issue is another problem with substance abuse. Some of the co-morbid disorders that occur with opioid addiction include the following:

  • Use of tobacco
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Stimulant abuse
  • Cannabis abuse
  • Benzodiazepine abuse
  • Dysthymia
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Antisocial personality disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • History of conduct disorder during childhood or adolescence

Assessment

The first process to finding the right treatment for your opioid addiction is the drug addiction assessment process. This is a simple procedure that requires you to provide information about your addiction. There are many options for drug addiction assessment in Illinois that you can choose from. You can access assessment services in person with qualified and experienced therapists or counselors, or by phone or online evaluations.

The purpose of the assessment process is to determine whether you have an addiction, how extensive your addiction is, whether you have a co-occurring condition, etc.

The information that is obtained from this process will be used to design a treatment plan that addresses your specific needs and issues. With so many new addictive substances showing up and so many users mixing opioids with other substances, drug treatment programs are adapting their treatment plans to meet the changing needs of people who abuse drugs.

During the assessment, you may also be referred to a doctor for a medical evaluation. You will need to go through a physical examination and probably a few tests. This is to provide an accurate diagnosis of any co-occurring disorder or medical condition that will affect how your addiction to opioids is treated.

It is critical for treatment providers to know if you have any medical condition before you enter a treatment facility so that they can provide the appropriate treatment and care as well as medications to manage the condition while treating your addiction.

Pre-Intake

The next step is the pre-intake process. This is a simple process in which you will be given a standardized form to fill out. The questionnaire will have questions pertaining to your addiction, medical and mental health, etc. You will also be given a list of documents and personal items that you need to bring when you enter the drug treatment center.

The pre-intake is simple yet crucial process that provides drug treatment providers important information to help them find the right opioid treatment program in Aurora, IL for you. As mentioned already, not all individuals respond the same way to a treatment so there must be one tailored to address your specific needs and issues.  

With the information you provide in the pre-intake process, the drug treatment center can tailor a treatment plan that would be most effective for you.

The goal is to make sure that you receive the right treatment to help you with your opioid abuse issues and make sure that you do not go back to using. As mentioned already, this is an important process that plays a vital role in finding the best drug treatment program for you based on your unique needs and issues.

Assessment

The drug addiction assessment is the first process you must go through to find the best treatment for meth addiction. It is conducted in private settings where a qualified professional trained to diagnose addictions will determine if you have an addiction.

You will be given a questionnaire that asks about your current drug use, symptoms, behavioral patterns, physical and mental health history, and how your meth abuse and addiction has affected your life. You may also be referred to a physical for a medical evaluation. This typically involves a physical exam to determine if you suffer from any co-occurring health condition that the drug treatment providers should know about.

The purpose of the assessment is to determine if you have an addiction, the extent of your addiction, etc. All the information gathered in this process is confidential and used only to ensure that you receive the right treatment. Knowing if you have any co-occurring medical or mental disorder will impact the type of treatment you receive once you enter a drug treatment program.

It will also affect the medications you are administered and the care you receive in the treatment center. This is why the assessment is a simple yet critical process that you need to undergo when looking for a treatment program for meth addiction.

Pre-Intake

The next step is the pre-intake process. This is a simple process in which you will be given a standardized form to fill out. The questionnaire will have questions pertaining to your addiction, medical and mental health, etc. You will also be given a list of documents and personal items that you need to bring when you enter the drug treatment center.

The pre-intake is simple yet crucial process that provides drug treatment providers important information to help them find the right opioid treatment program in Aurora, IL for you. As mentioned already, not all individuals respond the same way to a treatment so there must be one tailored to address your specific needs and issues.  

With the information you provide in the pre-intake process, the drug treatment center can tailor a treatment plan that would be most effective for you.

The goal is to make sure that you receive the right treatment to help you with your opioid abuse issues and make sure that you do not go back to using. As mentioned already, this is an important process that plays a vital role in finding the best drug treatment program for you based on your unique needs and issues.

Intake

The intake process is an interview with the admissions staff of a drug treatment facility. It allows them to learn more about you, your addiction and how they can best help you based on your unique needs and issues. With the information you provide during the intake, drug treatment providers can tailor a treatment plan to make sure that you recover successfully from your addiction.

During this process, you will be asked a wide range of questions. Keep in mind that some might be seem invasive or personal. Many individuals are embarrassed to answer some of the questions that they are asked, prompting them to be less than truthful.

However, you must keep in mind that these questions are asked to help you get the best treatment possible, so it is important to be as open and honest as you can. If not, it could only result in an ineffective treatment plan that does not do anything to help you get clean and recover from your addiction.

Some examples of questions you will be asked are:

  • When did you first start using drugs?
  • Did you start with prescription opioids?
  • How long did it take before you started using heroin?
  • How many times a day do you use opioids?
  • Do you take other drugs or alcohol with opioids? If so, how often?
  • What is your medical and mental health history? Are you currently on any medication for a condition?
  • What is your employment history?
  • What is your current financial situation?
  • Have you ever committed a crime or been arrested for committing a drug-related crime?
  • How has your addiction impacted your home and family life?
  • Have you received treatment for your addiction before? If so, how many times and how long did it take before you relapsed?

As you can see, some of the questions are quite personal and you may be embarrassed or ashamed to give truthful answers, especially when they pertain to your mental health issues. However, you should remember that everything is confidential and the information is only used to help make sure that you receive the appropriate treatment plan when you enter the facility.

Detox

Detox is a fundamental part of recovering from an addiction. Although it is not a treatment for addiction, it plays an important role as it is a precursor to the actual treatment you will be receiving for your addiction to opioids. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), detox is a series of interventions designed to manage acute intoxication and withdrawal symptoms.

Drugs, especially those like heroin, can stay in your system for a long period of time. It has been found that the toxins stored in your bloodstream play a role in cravings. The cravings you have for more heroin or opiates are the destructive, life-altering chains that lock you to the pattern of drug use. Detoxification flushes out these toxins left by drugs and greatly reduces cravings.

It is always best to detox from heroin at a drug treatment center. It is the safest option, whether it is for your physical or mental health. You should also bear in mind that medically-assisted detox has a higher success rate when compared to other methods. Alternative methods can be highly risky, and in some cases, even life-threatening.

When you are undergoing something as serious as detoxification for heroin addiction treatment, it is highly recommended that you seek professional assistance.

This way, you have medical professionals, including a team of physicians, nurses and other health care providers who have specialized training in the process of drug detoxification, to monitor the entire process. If any problem arises, there is a physician to monitor the conditions and prescribe the appropriate and safe medications to help in minimizing pain and managing cravings.

Inpatient Treatment Program

Also known as residential treatment program (RTP), an inpatient treatment center is one of the options you have when it comes to facilities for drug treatment. In this type of program, you are required to check yourself into a controlled facility to receive treatment for your addiction to opioids.

You receive 24/7 treatment and medical care as well as emotional support from a staff of trained and experienced professionals. In most cases, an inpatient program runs anywhere from 30 days to 6 months. However, some can last as long as 12 months, although this is less common.

When you choose to enroll in an inpatient treatment program, you get the opportunity to put your entire focus on recovering from your addiction and not worry about distractions of daily life and stress that might trigger you to use your drug of choice. There is a strict schedule that is accounted for in an inpatient center. You will meet with psychiatrists, psychologists, and counselors individually and in group settings to guide you on your recovery.

When you receive treatment in an inpatient treatment center, you will receive constant medical care and medications, especially when you have a co-occurring condition or disorder. The treatment plan is designed to prevent you from relapsing. The clinicians at the center will provide the expertise you need to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

In many inpatient centers, there are 12-step programs, such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA), to help with your treatment. Getting support from other individuals struggling with their own addiction and recovering addicts can help in many ways in your recovery. Some programs also have educational and vocational classes to help you when you complete your treatment and go back to your normal life.

If you need to remove yourself completely from your environment at home due to stress or access to drugs that could trigger opioid use, you can benefit greatly from an inpatient treatment center.

Outpatient Treatment Program

Outpatient treatment programs (OTPs) offer a number of the services that you receive in an inpatient program. The difference is that you do not have to stay in a facility to receive treatment for opioid addiction. You can live at home and take care of your daily responsibilities while receiving the treatment you need.

OTPs schedule treatment sessions on different days of the week. To recover successfully from your addiction, it is important to make sure that you attend all the sessions diligently. As you check in on your allotted days, the center will provide you with the counseling and medications required for your treatment and recovery.

Outpatient treatment programs are available in different formats and intensity levels. You can choose a program based on your individual needs and issues and severity of your addiction. OTPs typically focus on education, counseling and a network of support for patients.

You will be required to participate in therapy – individual and group, medication management, classes on relapse prevention, counseling sessions, a 12-step program and more. Some programs also offer access to art or music therapy.

Intensive outpatient program (IOP) is designed for patients who do not need much structure or the medical support that other levels of care offer. When you enroll in this type of program, you become empowered to live independently with support from your family and community. You can opt for a day or evening program that meets three days a week.

It is important to bear in mind that an OTP is best for those who have not abused opioids for an extended period of time as they require more comprehensive treatment and care and a more controlled environment to help with recovery. You can use an OTP as a step-down treatment after you have completed treatment in an RTC.

Aftercare and Sober Living

No matter what drug, addiction is a disease that stays with you forever. There is always a risk of relapse and going back to using and abusing opioids. This is why you need to find a service to help you stay clean and avoid relapse. Aftercare services are a great option as they offer the services and support you need to remain clean when you leave a drug treatment center. Some of the services they offer address things like:

  • Child care
  • Relationships
  • Finances
  • Education
  • Housing and transportation
  • Legal involvement
  • Vocation
  • Mental health
  • Medical health including HIV/AIDS testing and treatment

An aftercare program can be of immense help when you integrate back into society and your community. It can help in improving current relationships and building new social networks as well as finding involvement in your community. The focus of aftercare programs is to ensure that you have the support, from the center as well as your loved ones, to help you on your road to recovery and ensure that you stay on that road.

Sober Living

Sober living is another option you have after completing a treatment program in an inpatient center. It is basically a home that you share with other recovering addicts before you return home and integrate back into the community. You live in the sober living house as you would in your own home – you pay rent, buy food, clean up, etc. The goal is to help you get used to responsible living while making sure that you have the support and care of other people in your situation.

Sober living homes have strict rules and regulations that you will need to adhere to. Breach of any of the rules can result in your eviction. You will also need to submit to random drug testing. If you do not have a safe or stable living environment to return to after completing your treatment program, your best option is to enter a sober living home so that you can organize your life before finding your own place.

Get Treatment for Addiction in Aurora, Illinois

If you or a loved one needs treatment for addiction to opioids, you should look for a well-known drug treatment facility or rehab in Aurora, Illinois. There are many superb facilities that offer effective programs for prescription and illegal opioid abuse and addiction. You will receive 24/7 care and support as well as treatment and medications from a medical team.

Addiction to any substance is a serious problem that requires in-depth treatment for you to recover successfully. With the help of a reliable drug treatment center, you can begin your journey to recovering from your opioid addiction and live a happy and drug-free life. You can rebuild your relationship with family and friends as well as your community and live healthily without the shadow of drug addiction looming over you.

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