Sunday, October 21, 2018

New Jersey

New Jersey Rehabs

In a state with a population of almost 9 million people, and one of the most dense highway and railway systems in the country, its citizens are suffering. Within it’s 21 counties and 514 municipalities, 1,901 of its residents perished from a fatal drug overdose in the past year. The state is in a losing battle against heroin, fentanyl and prescription opiates.

The staggering rate of heroin and opiate abuse in New Jersey has been linked to an increase in drug-related crimes. With new law enforcement initiatives in place, local officials are aiming to detect and dismantle dangerous drug trafficking efforts.

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New Jersey Addiction Treatment

New Jersey is facing an alarming increase in heroin and opiate use. Over the past few years, heroin has become the primary drug cited during drug admission treatments. Law enforcement officials have linked much of the state’s drug-related crimes to large amounts of heroin and opioids available across different communities.

 

Primary Drugs abused in New Jersey

Alcohol 20,880 27%

Heroin 33,147 43%

Other Opiates 5,187 7%

Cocaine 3,638 5%

Marijuana 10,979 14%

Other Drugs 2,503 3%

Credit: https://hightimes.com/news/legalization/will-new-jersey-be-next-state-legalize-marijuana/

The New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice (NJDCJ) estimates that 70 percent of violent crimes result directly from drug activity.

Although the number of drug sentences in New Jersey are lower than the national average, cocaine and heroin represent 77 percent of the total charges in the state. In fact, heroin drug sentences are 38 percent higher than all federal sentencing cases.

The most commonly abused drugs in the Garden State include:

With busy seaports, two international airports and miles of highways, New Jersey has become a key element in drug trafficking activities. Its close proximity to major distribution regions like New York City and Philadelphia makes the state an important player in drug transshipments. Many illicit substances enter the state through private vehicles, trains, planes, cargo ships and parcel delivery services.

The state’s four largest cities – Newark, Jersey City, Elizabeth and Paterson – have all experienced a significant surge in the number of drug operation sites. In addition, the small city of Williamstown has found itself in the midst of heroin and opiate transit routes. Located right off a major expressway, drug trafficking in this suburban area has become a serious issue. Heroin-related deaths in Williamstown is 17.2 per 100,000 people – more than double the state average.

You don’t have to suffer in silence from an addiction. With the help of an addiction treatment specialist, you can learn the tools and resources to overcome your addiction once and for all. Give us a call today and find a treatment center near you.

NJ Drug Laws

The state of New Jersey is extremely harsh on drug-related cases. Legal penalties depend on the drug’s risk for dependency, amount involved, as well as whether the crime was related to possession or distribution.

The effects of a drug-related charge can be felt for years – from damaged relationships to problems finding or keeping a good job.

If you’re found in possession of an illicit substance, you may face the following penalties.

However, possession of cocaine, heroin and LSD can come with a more severe punishment. For example, if one of these drugs is found in your possession, you can face three to five years in jail, plus up to $15,000 in fines. Additionally, possessing an illegal drug within 1,000 feet from a school will add at least 100 hours of community service and an increased fine to your original sentence.

New Jersey Marijuana Laws

While medical marijuana is legal in New Jersey, the state’s laws are extremely restrictive. Patients and caregivers are required to register with the state, plus pay a $200 fee.

The qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in New Jersey include:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Spasticity disorders
  • Terminal illness

Each patient is limited to two ounces per month and home cultivation is strictly prohibited. State-licensed dispensaries are currently operational; however, there are very few locations.

Recreational marijuana, on the other hand, is illegal across the state. If a person is found in possession of marijuana for personal uses, they will face serious penalties.

The state will sometimes consider a conditional release for those facing their first sentence. Under a conditional release, an individual usually participates in a probation program rather than serving time in jail. After successfully completing probation, the charges will be dismissed.

Addiction Treatment Laws in New Jersey

New Jersey’s harm reduction laws aim to help prevent and overcome the harmful impact of drug abuse. Over the years, these laws have been put in place in an effort to combat the ripple effect of drug addiction in many neighborhoods.

A fairly new harm reduction law in the Garden State is the Overdose Prevention Act, which was enacted in May 2013. Since overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in New Jersey, the Overdose Prevention Act was enacted to help decrease the number of fatalities in the state. By providing legal protection to those who may witness an overdose, it encourages people to seek emergency medical help immediately. The law also allows doctors to provide naloxone – a medication that blocks the harmful effects of an opioid overdose – to those who have loved ones at risk of overdosing.

Bloodborne Disease Harm Reduction Act

New Jersey’s Bloodborne Disease Harm Reduction Act was signed into law in 2006. The law allows sterile syringe access programs to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and other infectious diseases. In addition, it also bridges the gap between addiction and drug treatment resources such as medical care, housing programs and other prevention services.

New Jersey has the fifth highest number of adult HIV/AIDS cases in the nation. Approximately 41 percent of HIV infections across the state are related to the sharing of contaminated syringes.

There are currently five New Jersey cities with sterile syringe access programs:

  • Atlantic City
  • Camden
  • Jersey City
  • Paterson
  • Newark

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA)

With New Jersey’s close location to major drug trafficking areas, the state is part of two High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) programs: New Jersey/New York HIDTA and Philadelphia-Camden HIDTA. Both programs work with state and federal agencies to fight dangerous drug trafficking efforts.

  • New Jersey/New York HIDTA: Involves a partnership among law enforcement agencies that covers four main components: drug enforcement, information sharing, training and drug abuse prevention. It helps coordinate plans to disrupt and dismantle drug efforts on major highways that expand across New York and New Jersey.
  • Philadelphia-Camden HIDTA: Many initiatives surround the “Safe Streets Task Force,” which focuses on reducing drug-related crimes in the most vulnerable neighborhoods.

Drug Court Program

Drug courts started in New Jersey in 1996. Their initial overwhelming success paved the way for additional drug court programs over the following decade.

The State of New Jersey has built one of the most successful and respected Drug Court programs in the country, with Drug Courts located in all 21 counties from Sussex to Cape May. The NJOPD, an early advocate of Drug Courts along with the Judiciary and the Attorney General’s Office, works to ensure that the program continues as an effective alternative to traditional criminal courts. Historically, the NJOPD has represented approximately 90% of all New Jersey Drug Court participants.

The current Director of the NJOPD’s Statewide Drug Court Unit is Deputy Public Defender Larry Bembry, who also serves as the Director of the NJOPD’s ISP Office.

 

Typically, a drug court program lasts anywhere from 12 to 24 months. Participants undergo intensive treatment and recovery services encompassing:

  • Individual counseling
  • Group Counseling
  • 12-step self-help groups
  • Relapse prevention
  • Community service involvement

Since April 2002, there has been more than 3,600 drug court graduates in New Jersey. Roughly 84 percent of those who complete the program are employed by graduation.

In New Jersey, drug courts have proven highly successful in reducing the repeat offenders and overall substance abuse rates.

Addiction Treatment Centers In NJ

Several addiction treatment centers in New Jersey offer discounted recovery programs to those without insurance and in need of help. Many of these facilities have received either financial disbursement from the state or financial assistance from local organizations.

When researching treatment options, you may be faced with the decision of whether to stay close to home or go to a facility out of state. While staying in-state can offer some advantages, out-of-state treatment centers are often more effective in regards to long-term sobriety. It’s a huge choice to recover far from home, but it can provide you with a fresh foundation. You deserve to live a healthy life without the negative influences of drugs and alcohol.

Find a treatment center that fits your needs and say goodbye to your addiction for good. Call us today and let us help you on your road to recovery.

Click Here to view other Rehab Centers in New Jersey.

In a state with a population of almost 9 million people, and one of the most dense highway and railway systems in the country, its citizens are suffering. Within it’s 21 counties and 514 municipalities, 1,901 of its residents perished from a fatal drug overdose in the past year. The state is in a losing battle against heroin, fentanyl and prescription opiates.

New Jersey is facing an alarming increase in heroin and opiate use. Over the past few years, heroin has become the primary drug cited during drug admission treatments. Law enforcement officials have linked much of the state’s drug-related crimes to large amounts of heroin and opioids available across different communities.

State statistics show that it is no longer the urban areas being overwhelmed with fentanyl and heroin, but suburban areas are now the new breeding ground for white collar drug users. Behind closed doors in large suburban homes, the new user is usually unsuspecting, and at one point was using pain medication legally after being prescribed it from a doctor. Once a prescription becomes too expensive or the prescription runs out, the cheap alternative is virtually everywhere.

Since the creation of the Prescription Monitoring program was put into place in 1998, and more recently the 2016 expansion signed in by Governor Chris Christie, the state has now started a system of watching| patients with their Medical professional provided prescriptions. The program was developed to attempt and suppress the popular “Doctor shopping” method. The NJPMP is a central data information sharing system for prescribers and pharmacists in New Jersey and partner states to track prescription sales of narcotic pain relievers and other drugs that frequently result in fatal heroin dependencies. Users in the past would visit several medical professionals in numerous cities and counties to attempt and cultivate mass quantities of prescription pills to then sell.

New Jersey law obligates prescribers to look over a patient’s prescription history before dispensing certain highly addictive controlled dangerous substances (“CDS”), including opioid pain relievers.  Veterinarians are exempt from this requirement.

Heroin is now the most accessible and affordable alternative once a prescription runs out or is no longer affordable. A single painkiller can cost up to $35 on the street, while a tenth of a gram can cost anywhere from $5 to $20. The appeal grows with users who have become addicted to the medications prescribed but are unable to attain.

On top of the dangerous Heroin option, there is now the synthetic opioid Fentanyl now taking over. With a high potency that crushes Heroin, its 50 times as powerful as street heroin and more addictive.

During the mid 2000’s, New Jersey Poison control began getting an alarming number of calls regarding people dropping dead after taking batches of heroin laced with fentanyl. In three years, 1,000 people in the US were dead from fentanyl. 87 came from New Jersey, that was 10 years ago.

In 2016, 900 people from New Jersey were killed from fentanyl. One third of those deaths were in people aged 25-35, with the average age of the those deceased being 36.

The New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice (NJDCJ) estimates that 70 percent of violent crimes result directly from drug activity.

Although the number of drug sentences in New Jersey are lower than the national average, cocaine and heroin represent 77 percent of the total charges in the state. In fact, heroin drug sentences are 38 percent higher than all federal sentencing cases.

The most commonly abused drugs in the Garden State include:

Heroin
Cocaine
Marijuana
Opioids
Tranquilizers
PCP

With busy seaports, two international airports and miles of highways, New Jersey has become a key element in drug trafficking activities. Its close proximity to major distribution regions like New York City and Philadelphia makes the state an important player in drug transshipments. Many illicit substances enter the state through private vehicles, trains, planes, cargo ships and parcel delivery services.

The state’s four largest cities – Newark, Jersey City, Elizabeth and Paterson – have all experienced a significant surge in the number of drug operation sites. In addition, the small city of Williamstown has found itself in the midst of heroin and opiate transit routes. Located right off a major expressway, drug trafficking in this suburban area has become a serious issue. Heroin-related deaths in Williamstown is 17.2 per 100,000 people – more than double the state average.

You don’t have to suffer in silence from an addiction. With the help of an addiction treatment specialist, you can learn the tools and resources to overcome your addiction once and for all. Give us a call today and find a treatment center near you.

NJ Drug Laws

The state of New Jersey is extremely harsh on drug-related cases. Legal penalties depend on the drug’s risk for dependency, amount involved, as well as whether the crime was related to possession or distribution.

The effects of a drug-related charge can be felt for years – from damaged relationships to problems finding or keeping a good job.

If you’re found in possession of an illicit substance, you may face the following penalties.

However, possession of cocaine, heroin and LSD can come with a more severe punishment. For example, if one of these drugs is found in your possession, you can face three to five years in jail, plus up to $15,000 in fines. Additionally, possessing an illegal drug within 1,000 feet from a school will add at least 100 hours of community service and an increased fine to your original sentence.

New Jersey Marijuana Laws

While medical marijuana is legal in New Jersey, the state’s laws are extremely restrictive. Patients and caregivers are required to register with the state, plus pay a $200 fee.

The qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in New Jersey include:

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Cancer
Crohn’s disease
Glaucoma
HIV/AIDS
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
Multiple Sclerosis
Muscular Dystrophy
Spasticity disorders
Terminal illness

Each patient is limited to two ounces per month and home cultivation is strictly prohibited. State-licensed dispensaries are currently operational; however, there are very few locations.

Recreational marijuana, on the other hand, is illegal across the state. If a person is found in possession of marijuana for personal uses, they will face serious penalties.

The state will sometimes consider a conditional release for those facing their first sentence. Under a conditional release, an individual usually participates in a probation program rather than serving time in jail. After successfully completing probation, the charges will be dismissed.

Addiction Treatment Laws in New Jersey

New Jersey’s harm reduction laws aim to help prevent and overcome the harmful impact of drug abuse. Over the years, these laws have been put in place in an effort to combat the ripple effect of drug addiction in many neighborhoods.

A fairly new harm reduction law in the Garden State is the Overdose Prevention Act, which was enacted in May 2013. Since overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in New Jersey, the Overdose Prevention Act was enacted to help decrease the number of fatalities in the state. By providing legal protection to those who may witness an overdose, it encourages people to seek emergency medical help immediately. The law also allows doctors to provide naloxone – a medication that blocks the harmful effects of an opioid overdose – to those who have loved ones at risk of overdosing.

Bloodborne Disease Harm Reduction Act

New Jersey’s Bloodborne Disease Harm Reduction Act was signed into law in 2006. The law allows sterile syringe access programs to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and other infectious diseases. In addition, it also bridges the gap between addiction and drug treatment resources such as medical care, housing programs and other prevention services.

New Jersey has the fifth highest number of adult HIV/AIDS cases in the nation. Approximately 41 percent of HIV infections across the state are related to the sharing of contaminated syringes.

There are currently five New Jersey cities with sterile syringe access programs:

Atlantic City
Camden
Jersey City
Paterson
Newark

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA)

With New Jersey’s close location to major drug trafficking areas, the state is part of two High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) programs: New Jersey/New York HIDTA and Philadelphia-Camden HIDTA. Both programs work with state and federal agencies to fight dangerous drug trafficking efforts.

New Jersey/New York HIDTA: Involves a partnership among law enforcement agencies that covers four main components: drug enforcement, information sharing, training and drug abuse prevention. It helps coordinate plans to disrupt and dismantle drug efforts on major highways that expand across New York and New Jersey.

Philadelphia-Camden HIDTA: Many initiatives surround the “Safe Streets Task Force,” which focuses on reducing drug-related crimes in the most vulnerable neighborhoods.

Drug Court Program

Drug courts started in New Jersey in 1996. Their initial overwhelming success paved the way for additional drug court programs over the following decade.

The State of New Jersey has built one of the most successful and respected Drug Court programs in the country, with Drug Courts located in all 21 counties from Sussex to Cape May. The NJOPD, an early advocate of Drug Courts along with the Judiciary and the Attorney General’s Office, works to ensure that the program continues as an effective alternative to traditional criminal courts. Historically, the NJOPD has represented approximately 90% of all New Jersey Drug Court participants.

The current Director of the NJOPD’s Statewide Drug Court Unit is Deputy Public Defender Larry Bembry, who also serves as the Director of the NJOPD’s ISP Office.

Typically, a drug court program lasts anywhere from 12 to 24 months. Participants undergo intensive treatment and recovery services encompassing:

Court appearances
Random drug testing
Detoxification, if necessary
Residential programs
Outpatient programs
Individual counseling
Group Counseling
12-step self-help groups
Relapse prevention
Community service involvement

Since April 2002, there has been more than 3,600 drug court graduates in New Jersey. Roughly 84 percent of those who complete the program are employed by graduation.

In New Jersey, drug courts have proven highly successful in reducing the repeat offenders and overall substance abuse rates.

Primary Drugs abused in New Jersey

Alcohol 20,880 27%
Heroin 33,147 43%
Other Opiates 5,187 7%
Cocaine 3,638 5%
Marijuana 10,979 14%
Other Drugs 2,503 3%

Sex
Male 46,919 68%
Female 22,543 32%

County of Residence
Atlantic 4,576 7%     Middlesex 5,199 7%
Bergen 3,338 5%       Monmouth 6,062 9%
Burlington 2,739 4%        Morris 2,591 4%
Camden 5,314 8%              Ocean 7,103 10%
Cape May 2,239 3%           Passaic 3,980 6%
Cumberland 1,974 3%       Salem 555 1%
Essex 5,911 9%               Somerset 1,862 3%
Gloucester 2,568 4%     Sussex 1,143 2%
Hudson 3,899 6%           Union 3,143 5%
Hunterdon 866 1%         Warren 917 1%
Mercer 2,592 4%             Other 906 1%

Age at admission
18-21 5,118 7%
22-24 7,493 11%
25-29 13,473 19%
30-34 11,332 16%
35-44 13,767 20%
45-54 11,598 17%
55 and over 4,754 7%

Race/Ethnicity

White (non-Hispanic) 42,576 61%

Black (non-Hispanic) 15,055 22%
Hispanic Origin 10,734 15%
Other 1,112 2%

New Jersey Heroin laws

possession of heroin is charged as both a federal and state criminal offense. Under federal law, for a first offense, an individual must pay a minimum fine of $1,000 and may be sentenced to up to one year in jail. If an individual is convicted for the second time, he or she must pay a minimum fine of $2,500 and must serve between 15 days and 2 years in jail. Finally, if convicted for heroin possession for a third time, an individual must pay a minimum fine of $5,000 and serve at least 90 days (and up to 3 years) in jail.

In New Jersey, the trafficking, sale, and possession of heroin and other powerful narcotics is prohibited — as it is in all other states. Possession of even a tiny amount of the drug is charged as a third degree felony, punishable by up to five years in prison, while distribution of heroin in a public park or housing project often results in much more severe punishments upon conviction.

The main provisions of New Jersey’s heroin laws are listed below. See FindLaw’s Drug Charges section for additional articles and resources.

Code Section

24:21-1, et seq.; 2C:35-2, et seq.

Possession

Crime of 3rd degree, $35,000

Sale

.5 oz. or less: crime of 3rd degree, $75,000; .5 oz. to 5 oz.: crime of 2nd degree; Over 5 oz.: crime of 1st degree, fixed prison term and $300,000; Selling within 1000 feet of school: fixed prison term and up to $100,000; Selling to minor or pregnant female: double penalties

Trafficking

Leader of narcotics trafficking network: life (25 yr. minimum before parole) and/or $500,000

New Jersey Cocaine laws

New Jersey cocaine laws are toughest on drug traffickers, with a 25-year minimum mandatory prison sentence (before parole), while those charged with possession have the opportunity to enter a treatment program if it’s the first offense. Selling cocaine to a minor or a pregnant woman can result in double penalties.

The New Jersey judicial system has a drug court program that offers treatment and rehabilitation for non-violent drug offenders with no prior criminal record. Specialized drug court judges work with attorneys, probation officers, treatment professionals, and substance abuse evaluators to encourage recovery and reduce recidivism. Those enrolled in the program receive probation instead of prison, but must submit to regular drug testing and court appearances.

According to New Jersey’s cocaine laws, these are some of the consequences expected with cocaine charges.

Code Section  24:21-1, et seq.; 2C:35-2, et seq.

Possession    

Crime of 3rd degree, $35,000

Sale    

.5 oz. or less: crime of 3rd degree, $75,000; .5 oz. to 5 oz.: crime of 2nd degree; Over 5 oz.: crime of 1st degree, fixed prison term and $300,000; Selling within 1000 feet of school: fixed prison term and up to $100,000; Selling to minor or pregnant female: double penalties

Trafficking    

Leader of narcotics trafficking network: life (25 yr. minimum before parole) and/or $500,000

Psychedelic Drug charges in New Jersey

For Possession of Narcotics or Controlled Dangerous Substances, under N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10, which includes cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, acid, ecstasy, GBH, and all other illegal narcotics, stimulants, hallucinogens, opiates, or depressants, an individual can face three to five years in prison, a fine of $1,000 to $25,000, loss of driver’s license, mandatory drug education and rehabilitation programs.

An individual can be charged with a crime if they are in Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.  An individual charged with possession drug paraphernalia under N.J.S.A. 2C:36-2 can face up to six months in prison, a fine of $500 to $1,000, and suspension of their driver’s license for up to two years.

An individual charged with Simple Possession of Unauthorized Prescription Drugs can be charged with a third-degree indictable offense, with maximum penalties of up to five years in prison and substantial fines.

Drug Court in New Jersey

The State of New Jersey has actually developed one of the most effective and highly regarded Drug Court programs in the nation, with Drug Courts situated in all 21 counties from Sussex to Cape May. The NJOPD, an early supporter of Drug Courts in addition to the Judiciary and the Attorney General’s Office, works to guarantee that the program continues as an efficient alternative to conventional criminal courts. Historically, the NJOPD has represented roughly 90% of all New Jersey Drug Court individuals.

The present Director of the NJOPD’s Statewide Drug Court Unit is Deputy Public Defender Larry Bembry, who also functions as the Director of the NJOPD’s ISP Office

Drug Court is a probation sentence with substantial conditions. Its objective is to keep offenders whose criminal habits has actually been triggered by drug and/or alcohol abuse devoid of the impact of alcohol and drugs in their lives so that they might avoid future involvement in the criminal justice system. Drug Courts work due to the fact that judges, defense lawyer, district attorneys, probation officers and drug abuse specialists all interact cooperatively to construct and implement an encouraging environment to motivate and monitor an individual’s recovery. Following an extensive screening procedure, accepted non-violent offenders with drug/alcohol issues get into a strictly-monitored drug abuse} treatment program integrated into a probationary term. This proactive method includes treatment, therapy and other resources meant to help individuals with issues such as job training, education and health care. Drug Courts have been very successful in producing considerable expense savings by replacing expensive imprisonment with more economical treatment programs.

What happens if you fail out of drug court?

The Drug Court program is categorized as “special probation”, which is a little bit} different from routine probation. If someone is sentenced to normal probation, and they breach the terms of probation, the judge would re-sentence them anything that might have been sentenced when they initially pled or were found guilty. However the statute for Drug Court and unique probation has phrasing that is a little bit different: “any sentence that may have been enforced, or that would have been needed to be enforced, |initially for the offense for which the individual was convicted or adjudicated delinquent.” The difference is including that term “or that would have been needed to be enforced”.

This is essential due to the fact that numerous severe crimes have obligatory charges. Nevertheless in a common plea situation the district attorney might ask the judge to waive the enhanced charges as part of the plea deal or accept a lower charge that does not carry an enhanced charge. With Drug Court and special probation, this isn’t done. The individual pleads guilty, and as an option to the routine sentencing they are placed into the program. For that reason, if the person  stops working with the program, the judge would then sentence them in accordance with the initial charge, with the enhancements. The accused does not get to pitch an argument to the judge, asking to waive the enhancements, which is something that could be done in the case of an offense of regular probation.

How does drug court work?

A Drug Court participant will be needed to appear in Drug Court regularly to stay qualified for the program. At each appearance the Judge will be provided a progress report prepared by the treatment group relating to drug test results, presence and involvement in treatment and compliance with the Diversion Supervisor or Probation Officer.

The Judge might ask the participant their concern about his/her development, and go over any particular issues the individual might have been experiencing. If they are succeeding, the participant will be motivated to continue with the Program and work with the treatment group towards graduation. If not succeeding, the Judge will go over these concerns with the individual and the treatment team and identify additional action. In case of program infractions; i.e., missed or unclean urine screens, failure to go to individual or group therapy, failure to go to 12-step meetings, and so on, will lead to sanctions enforced by the court.

Repeated offenses of the program expectations, and failure to advance adequately, might result in termination from the program. Failure to appear in Court on the date and time arranged may result in a warrant being issued for the individual’s arrest. If a participant can not appear in Court as arranged|, the Diversion Supervisor or Probation Officer and Drug Court Administrator should be informed as soon as possible.

The following infractions may lead to termination from the Drug Court Program:

Warrants and/or new arrests; missing drug tests;  showing a lack of participation in the program and by refusing to cooperate with treatment, and violence or dangers of violence directed at the treatment members or others. The Drug Court Judge will make the last decisions concerning termination from the Program.

DRUG COURT PROGRAM RULES

A Drug Court participant is required to abide by the following rules:

♦ DO NOT USE OR POSSESS ANY DRUGS OR ALCOHOL. Maintaining an alcohol and drug free lifestyle is the most important part of the recovery process. All medication over the counter or prescribed by a physician must be authorized by the Treatment Staff or Diversion Manager prior to being taken.

♦ DO NOT ENTER ESTABLISHMENTS WHO’S PRIMARY FUNCTION IS THE SALE OF ALCOHOL OR GAMBLING. Casinos, grocery store liquor sections,bars or packaged liquor stores are off limits. You may not purchase liquor for any reason.

♦ ATTEND ALL TREATMENT SESSIONS. If a participant is unable to attend ascheduled session, he/she must contact the treatment counselor before a session is missed.

♦ REPORT TO DIVERSION MANAGER/PROBATION OFFICER AS

DIRECTED. If unable to make an appointment, contact the Diversion Manager/Probation Officer immediately.

♦ BE ON TIME TO APPOINTMENTS WITH TREATMENT PROVIDER, DIVERSION MANAGER/PROBATION OFFICER AND COURT. If aparticipant is late, he/she may not be allowed to attend appointment and could be considered non-compliant.

♦ DO NOT MAKE THREATS TOWARD OTHER PARTICIPANTS OR STAFF OR ACT IN A VIOLENT MANNER. Violent or inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated and will be reported to the Court. This may result in termination from the Drug Court Program.

♦ DRESS APPROPRIATELY FOR COURT AND TREATMENT SESSIONS.

Clothing bearing drug or alcohol related themes or promoting or advertising alcohol or drug use is considered inappropriate. Sunglasses, hats and bandanas are not to be worn inside the Courthouse, treatment center or probation office.

♦ ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH. Overcoming chemical dependency is not easy. This

will take the participant’s best effort and truthfulness. Participants who are not truthful will be dealt with appropriately.

♦ DO NOT LEAVE THE COUNTY WITHOUT PERMISSION. You must get

permission from your Diversion Manager/Probation Officer prior to leaving Callaway County. If you are planning to leave the state, you must get approval from the Drug Court team and apply for a travel permit with your Diversion Manager/Probation Officer. Travel permits require a 15-day processing period. It is your responsibility to apply for the permit in a timely manner.

♦ TURN IN ALL DOCUMENTS ONE (1) DAY PRIOR TO COURT

APPEARANCE. In order to receive credit for AA/NA’s, payment of fees or community

service hours a participant must turn the proper documentation into their probation officer no

later then the day prior to their court appearance.

♦ REPORT FOR TESTING UPON CONTACT WITH LAW ENFORCMENT.

You must report for a drug test within one hour of any contact with a law enforcement officer. 

Drug take back program

Prescription substance abuse is the fastest growing drug issue in the Country. The Administration’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Strategy entitled “Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis,” offers a nationwide structure for minimizing prescription drug diversion and abuse by supporting the growth of state-based prescription drug tracking programs; advising safe and secure, easier, and environmentally responsible disposal techniques to eliminate expired, unused, or unnecessary medications from the home; supporting education for patients and doctors; and decreasing the frequency of pill mills and physician shopping through enforcement efforts.

A detailed strategy to resolve prescription drug abuse should consist of a correct disposal of unused, unwanted, or ended medications. Supplying people with a safe and hassle-free way to get rid of illegal drugs will assist in preventing diversion and abuse of these substances and show sound environmental stewardship. Federal rulemaking is underway and will further improve the viability and scope of state and neighborhood take-back programs. In the meantime, states are motivated to work with the DEA to carry out additional take-back events and inform the general public about safe and efficient drug return and disposal.

Underage Drug Statistics

  • 39% of ‘tweens and teens ages 12–17 in NJ admitted to smoking marijuana at least once – US Department of Health and Human Services
  • The Governor’s Council on Alcohol & Drug Abuse found that NJ has some of the cheapest, purist heroin in the country. A bag of heroin can be bought for as little as $5.
  • New Jersey has the sixth highest rate of fatal youth drug overdoses in the country, according to a 2015 report by the watchdog organization the trust for America’s Health.
  • 10.7% of all deaths among people ages 12-25 are the result of a drug overdose.
  • 15% of NJ teens in grades 9–12 say they drank alcohol for the first time before age 13, compared to 19% of teens nationally, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services
  • 70% of NJ teens who abuse prescription drugs say they get them from a friend or relative – National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

Among adolescent admissions in New Jersey, Marijuana and Alcohol were the most prevalent substances of abuse

  • Of the total adolescent male admissions, 94.1 percent (8,100) reported Marijuana use, and 58.1 percent (5,000) reported Alcohol use
  • Of the total adolescent female admissions, 81.6 percent (1,842) reported Marijuana use, and 58.9 percent (1,329) reported Alcohol use
  • Furthermore, 12.8 percent of all admissions reported Cocaine use, 10.1 percent (873) of male admissions and 22.7 percent (512) of female admissions
  • Also, 4.9 percent (537) of the total adolescent admissions reported Heroin use, 3.1 percent (270) of male admissions and 11.8 percent (267) of female admissions. 3.5 percent (299) of male admissions and 4.7 percent (107) of female admissions also reported Opiates and Synthetics use

According to the 2006 N-SSATS Survey:

  • New Jersey showed a one-day total of 30,106 clients in treatment, the majority of whom (26,699 or 88.7 percent) were in an out-patient treatment program
  • Of the total number of clients in treatment on this date, 2,111 (7 percent) were under the age of 18

Adolescent Alcohol Use and Abuse in New Jersey

  • In New Jersey, rates of Alcohol or illicit drug dependence or abuse were significantly higher among females than males; 22,000 males and 39,000 females abused or were dependent on Alcohol or drugs in the past year
  • In New Jersey 20.6 percent of adolescents (152,000) used Alcohol in the past month, and 11.7 percent (87,000) engaged in binge drinking, which is defined as the consumption of five or more drinks on the same occasion within the past 30 days
  • In New Jersey rates of current Alcohol use were significantly higher for adolescent females (24.3 percent) than for males (17.2 percent), but rates of past-month binge drinking were similar between adolescent males (10.7 percent) and females (12.9 percent)

Teen Illicit Substance Use in New Jersey

According to the combined 2003–2006 NSDUH:

  • Approximately 73,000 (9.9 percent) of the 738,000 adolescents in New Jersey used an illicit drug in the past month; 50,000 (7.3 percent) used Marijuana, and 33,000 (4.5 percent) used an illicit drug other than Marijuana
  • In New Jersey adolescent females were significantly more likely than the males to have used any illicit drugs and were approximately twice as likely as males to have used any illicit drugs other than Marijuana in the past month
  • There were no significant differences in Marijuana use between adolescent males and females in New Jersey

The misuse of pain relievers among youth is also a major public health concern:

  • In New Jersey, 20,000 adolescent males and 25,000 adolescent females used pain relievers non-medically in the 12 months prior to the interview
  • There was no significant difference in rates of non-medical pain reliever use between females and males (6.9 v. 5.2 percent)

According to the New Jersey Patch, the 31 most heroin affected cities in the state are as follows:

#1

Newark had 1,376 reported heroin abuse cases in 2015, a 17 percent increase over 2014, as the stories of the drug’s addictive consequences continually repeat themselves. Three years ago, two Newark men were among four people arrested in Massachusetts and charged with transporting more than 1,000 bags of heroin, the Massachusetts State Police announced.

#2

One of the nation’s most troubled cities once again finds itself near the top of this list. Paterson had 851 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015, up 16 from last year.In one of the city’s most notorious drug busts, authorities arrested the alleged ringleader and 14 other defendants in 2012 in the takedown of a major narcotics supply network that allegedly was distributing millions of dollars in heroin out of a number of heroin processing “mills” and stash houses in Paterson,

#3

Fortunes are falling in one of America’s most historic tourist attractions. The drug epidemic in Atlantic City is getting much worse in the seaside resort that reported 557 cases of heroin abuse in 2014. In 2015, the number was 733, a 31 percent jump. And it’s not confined to what’s known as “America’s Favorite Playground.” The Atlantic City Violent Crimes Task Force has targeted pushers in neighboring communities who have helped bring drugs to the long-troubled tourist attraction. Two years ago, two Galloway men (one of whom, Ruben Sewell, is pictured above) allegedly ran a drug mill that was off-the-radar of local law enforcement for months; until this summer, when they were both nabbed – in plain sight.

#4

The up-and-coming transit city remains plagued by what’s made it infamous: crime and drugs. Jersey City had 716 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. Three years ago, Jersey City police arrested a 15-year-old boy and seized 59 bags of suspected heroin after doing surveillance on Van Nostrand Avenue because of numerous complaints of drug trafficking in the area, according to The Jersey Journal.

#5

Toms River finds itself dealing with the problems of urban decay in its supposedly safe suburban confines. The drug problem, meanwhile, just keeps getting dramatically worse. The township had 436 reported heroin abuse cases in 2014; in 2015, the number was 667, a 51 percent increase. Just over two years ago, Toms River and Brick cops teamed up to bust two suspected township heroin dealers, including Cassandra Ortiz (pictured), seizing 1,284 wax folds of the drug, more than $12,000 in cash, a stolen gun and two cars in the process.

#6

The city dubbed “Apocolypse, N.J.” in a recent of issue of Rolling Stone had 535 reported cases heroin abuse in 2015. Over the past three years, a network of drug dealers in Camden’s Cooper Lanning and Bergen Square neighborhoods—36 men and women in all—have been indicted by a state grand jury (photo of an alleged ringleader above). Dubbed “Operation Billboard,” the arrests started coming down on May 30, 2012, for a heroin network in the heart of Camden that allegedly involved gang members from members of the Ñetas and Latin Kings street gangs.

#7

The problems of New Jersey’s urban centers – including drug trafficking and gang violence – have

increasingly spread beyond cities such as Elizabeth, where 382 reported cases of heroin abuse took place in 2015. In June 2012, 70 law enforcement officers from four counties arrested 24 individuals – including one from Elizabeth – in a drug, gang and weapons sweep that began with an investigation into an attempted murder in Morristown. A crime task force that worked on the case included prosecutors’ offices from Warren, Essex and Union counties.

#8

Once considered one of the nation’s safest communities, Brick now has the unfortunate distinction of rivaling New Jersey’s largest cities in terms of reported heroin abuse cases (430). Both communities also have approximately the same population. Following a two-month long investigation into heroin distribution, members of the Brick Police Drug Enforcement Unit arrested three people in July 2011 and recovered 250 bags of heroin.

#9

The problems of New Jersey’s urban centers – including drug trafficking and gang violence – have increasingly spread beyond cities such as Elizabeth, where 382 reported cases of heroin abuse took place in 2015. In June 2012, 70 law enforcement officers from four counties arrested 24 individuals – including one from Elizabeth – in a drug, gang and weapons sweep that began with an investigation into an attempted murder in Morristown. A crime task force that worked on the case included prosecutors’ offices from Warren, Essex and Union counties.

#10

Yet another South Jersey suburban community has found its way onto this notorious list. Egg Harbor Township had 310 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. In May 2012, Daniel Parrish, 37, of Egg Harbor Township (pictured above) was stopped by police at the Wawa at Route 30 and 5th Avenue in Galloway Township for a motor vehicle violation, but further investigation of the vehicle led to his arrest on CDS charges. Police discovered large amounts of heroin and drug paraphernalia consistent with distribution.

#11

One of South Jersey’s largest but most rural cities has become a center for drug trafficking. Vineland had 284 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. Just over two years ago, police arrested two people after discovering more than 1,000 bags of heroin following a traffic stop in Vineland. Police discovered 20 bags of heroin in the pockets of Jermaine Floyd, according to the Vineland police.

#12

Like Vineland, one of South Jersey’s most rural cities has become a center for drug trafficking. Millville had 276 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#13

Berkley Township, One of several a New Jersey shore community dealing with an increase in heroin abuse. In 2016, Berkeley Police recently arrested three men after a month long investigation into a heroin operation that distributed more than 10,000 individual doses every week with a street value of $100,000 Police chief Karin T DiMichele said. Berkley Township had 271 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#14

Trenton

Trenton was identified in a report entitled “Scenes from an Epidemic: A Report on the SCI’s Investigation of Prescription Pill and Heroin Abuse,” released recently by the state Commission of Investigation, that cited the city as a fertile ground for drug addicts and members of street gangs who distribute heroin throughout the state. The city had 267 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#15

Jackson
Another suburban, and somewhat rural Ocean County community has found its way on this list. Jackson had 242 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. Just over two years ago, two Ocean County residents, including one from Brick, were arrested in a raid at a Jackson home where police seized 240 wax folds of heroin. One of the suspects allegedly tried to flush the evidence down a toilet.
#16

Lower Township

One of the more surprising appearances on this list, Lower Township is just one of several Cape May County communities dealing with an increase in heroin abuse. Cape May County, known for its peaceful beaches and the old-fashioned styles of Cape May and Ocean City, had the highest rate of heroin and opiate abuse of any county per capita in New Jersey in 2012. Lower Township had 241 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015, jumping by 56 over 2014.

#17

Middletown

Authorities have identified heroin abuse as an “epidemic” in Monmouth County. Middletown had 236 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. Just over two years ago, a pair of Monmouth residents conspired to manufacture and sell drugs after they allegedly were found in possession of more than 300 bags of heroin, according to Middletown police. Rachel T. Certo, 27, of Holmdel, and George Sayegh, 31, of Leonardo, allegedly used text messages to set up a drug deal on Dec. 21, according to police.

#18

Lacey Township

Some of the most notorious, tragic and surprising stories of drug use have originated recently in Lacey Township in Ocean County, where 226 cases of heroin abuse were reported in 2015. In October 2013, police charged six local residents – including Ralph Monaco (pictured above) – after discovering drugs being dealt at the Lacey branch of the Ocean County Library. An investigation led to the arrest of one Lacey resident who allegedly injected the drug while in the library bathroom.

#19

Little Egg Harbor

Little Egg Harbor is yet another surprising entry to this list, a mid-sized suburban community from Ocean County in the Jersey Shore. Eight towns from Ocean County are on this list – more than any other county. Little Egg Harbor had 207 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#20

Asbury Park

One of the state’s most historic tourism landmarks has made a comeback in recent years. But the drug trade still plagues the seashore city. Asbury Park had 202 reported cases in 2015. Just over a year ago, a joint effort by county and local police resulted in the arrest of 16 people and the seizure of heroin and cash in drug sweeps conducted in Neptune City and Asbury Park.

#21

Manchester

Manchester is yet another new Ocean County entry to this list. The town is known for its senior communities, and has one of the oldest median populations in the United States. But the drug trade has infiltrated all Ocean County towns. Manchester had 182 reported cases in 2015. In March 2016, two men were arrested and 569 bags of heroin worth $5,500 were seized after Manchester police pulled a car over for a motor vehicle violation and saw drug paraphernalia inside the car, police said.

 

#22

Stafford Township

Stafford Township, mostly known for the names “Manahawkin,” “Ocean Acres” and “Beach Haven West,” is yet another new Ocean County entry to the list. The gateway to Long Beach Island had 180 reported cases in 2015. In March 2016, Alesha Connelly, 22, was arrested and found in possession of heroin and other drugs near her 14-month old baby, police said.

#23

Plainfield is home to much wealth, but also many incidents of drugs, crime and tragedy. Plainfield had 180 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. In June 2011, 18 people – including Dante R. Faulcon, 24, of North Plainfield  (pictured) – were arrested and 150 bags of heroin recovered as part of a Plainfield-wide drug sweep performed with the assistance of Union County, state and federal agents, according to mycentraljersey.com.

#24

East Orange

A tough town that has been battling problems with crime for decades. East Orange had 166 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. In In August 2013, an East Orange man caught shoplifting several hundred dollars worth of cell phones from CVS was also found in possession of heroin, Cedar Grove Police said.

#25

Edison

Thomas Edison’s old hometown is also home to major drug trafficking routes, such as the turnpike and Route 1. But, like Woodbridge and Old Bridge, the problem of heroin abuse – 162 reported cases in 2015 – is a local one, too. Edison police have taken pre-emptive action: In May 2013, the township assisted in a State Police-organized sweep that broke up a major heroin distribution ring that reached into six counties.

#26

Keansburg

Keansburg is yet another Jersey Shore town with tourist attractions that finds itself on this list. Keansburg had 160 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#27

Middlesex

Middlesex is a small Middlesex County town of 13,000 that somehow made it’s way onto this list. Middlesex had 159 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#28

Old Bridge

Like Woodbridge and Edison, this Middlesex County community is at the crossroads of New Jersey, home to several major highways and a rising drug problem. Old Bridge had 158 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#29

Woodbridge

Drug trafficking has long been an issue on the major roads, such as Route 1 and the New Jersey Turnpike, that pass through here. But in Woodbridge, heroin is a local problem, too. Woodbridge had 158 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015. In November 2013, police were conducting a traffic stop in the township when they discovered that the driver they had pulled over was transporting five bricks of heroin.

#30

Galloway

Another surprising entry to this list, Galloway is home to Stockton University, the Garden State Parkway and large, cookie-cutter developments. Galloway had 148 reported cases of heroin abuse in 2015.

#31

Long Branch

Long Branch is a seaside landmark that has continued to be plagued by crime and drugs. Long Branch had 148 reported cases in 2015.

New Jersey state support for those struggling with addiction

  • In 2011, the state of New Jersey formed the Division of Mental Health Services and the Division of Addiction Services into the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). When the two merged it began an opportunity for the state to provide more services geared toward addiction that includes a more well rounded approach by including mental health services to treat underlying issues that can cause substance abuse.

    DMHAS is responsible for the operation of three regional adult psychiatric hospitals (Ancora, Greystone and Trenton), and one specialized facility providing maximum security (Ann Klein). All Hospitals, are accredited by The Joint Commission (TJC). All three regional adult psychiatric hospitals are also certified by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

    Several addiction treatment centers in New Jersey offer discounted recovery programs to those without insurance and in need of help. Many of these facilities have received either financial disbursement from the state or financial assistance from local organizations.

    When researching treatment options, you may be faced with the decision of whether to stay close to home or go to a facility out of state. While staying in-state can offer some advantages, out-of-state treatment centers are often more effective in regards to long-term sobriety. It’s a huge choice to recover far from home, but it can provide you with a fresh foundation. You deserve to live a healthy life without the negative influences of drugs and alcohol.

    Find a treatment center that fits your needs and say goodbye to your addiction for good. Call us today and let us help you on your road to recovery.

    Click Here to view other Rehab Centers in New Jersey.

    Those looking to find treatment have several options for care and should be prepared for the type of steps involved on their path to sobriety.

    Before starting treatment, patients are asked to take an assessment test to find out more of their medical background, so that doctors and their care team can begin to assemble a care plan suited best for the individual.

    Patients are asked questions like:

    • How often they had been using
    • How much they had been using
    • How long they had been using
    • Prior mental health issues they are aware of
    • Physical health issues they may have
    • Lifestyle questions, such as family, work and hobbies

    Blood and urine tests are commonly taken to evaluate the current drugs in the system, and then depending on the results of the assessment and the tests, a patient is given a recommendation. The recommendation can range from outpatient to inpatient or just participation in local support groups.

    Pre-Intake then begins with a phone call from a treatment councilor who then presents the options to the patient.

    Pre intake will help the councilor determine if the patient:

    • Is truly in need of a structured treatment program
    • If they have an underlying mental heath issue that needs to be treated as well
    • If they are eligible for the services

    It is important to find out more about the facility you are going to before entering, as there can be many factors as to why treatment fails. 

    Once you have selected the program/facility to receive addiction treatment services, the first step is the intake process. In most cases, you will meet with a doctor, counselor, or therapist. The addiction specialist will review your mental health history as well as your medical history. You may also receive a physical exam or a mental health screening at this time. The purpose of this is to ensure that you will receive the treatment services that will best meet your needs.

    It is vital that you are honest in your responses, as your answers form the foundation for your initial treatment offerings. All the information you provide is confidential so your complete candor allows the addiction team to individualize services for your needs.

    It is also important that you bring to your intake evaluation a list of your medications. This includes prescribed medications, over the counter medications, and any herbs or supplements you may be taking.

    After completing this process, you will move forward to the next steps of treatment as determined by your intake evaluation. Often, this will include a formalized detox.

    Detox

    As the name implies, detox is used to remove toxins from your body. By first clearing your system of the harmful substances that have commandeered your brain, you are in a better position to benefit from additional treatment options.

    According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the detoxification process consists of the following three sequential and essential components:

    • Evaluation
    • Stabilization
    • Fostering patient readiness for and entry into treatment

    A detoxification process that does not incorporate all three critical components is considered incomplete and inadequate by the consensus panel.

    Social detox is often a short-term strategy while a medically supervised detox is done under the specific care of medical and mental health professionals. Regardless of the method, both are intended to help you manage your withdrawal symptoms and provide encouragement and professional support during the process.

    There are several components that factor into which detox option is best for you including:

    • Your drug of choice
    • The duration and frequency of abuse
    • Single substance versus polysubstance abuse
    • Previous detox attempts
    • Your current health and your goals for treatment

    Detoxification is not only important mentally as you prepare yourself for recovery but may also be medically necessary. Detoxing from a substance without the guidance and supervision of specially trained professionals can result in an unpredictable and potentially dangerous withdrawal. A formalized detox program will not only increase your safety but also your comfort.

    Inpatient Treatment

    In 1982, former First Lady Betty Ford lends her name to a treatment center for alcoholism and other drug addictions. Since that time, inpatient treatment facilities have grown and evolved offering people many choices. Regardless of which option you choose, trained professionals will guide you through the treatment program and offer you the required services you need.

    Residential Treatment

    In a residential treatment program, a person leaves their home and temporarily moves into the facility. This is an optimal choice for people who:

    • Are at risk of relapse in their home or community
    • Have a serious emotional and behavioral problem in addition to their addiction
    • Haven’t been successful in outpatient treatment
    • Need intensive supervised help that is implemented by trained staff

    There are several key values that an effective residential treatment program offers:

    • A comprehensive assessment
    • An individualized treatment plan
    • Individual and group therapy
    • Ongoing access to nursing staff

    Every residential program varies slightly in services offered as well as length of treatment. It is therefore important to ask about this in your pre-intake conversations to determine which program will best suit your needs.

    Partial Hospitalization Treatment

    One treatment option that provides you with a bit more flexibility is a partial hospitalization program (PHP), which allows a person to live at home, or possibly a sober house or halfway house, but who attends a substance abuse treatment center to for treatment during the day.

    Treatment may include group therapy, individual therapy, life skills, vocational counseling, and drug and medical evaluations. While these services are very common in inpatient and outpatient treatment, in a PHP the services are typically offered for 5 to 7 days.

    A person who would best benefit from this treatment option would be one who:

    • Wants to receive the high level treatment offered at inpatient facilities
    • Is not comfortable in an inpatient setting due to family or work obligations
    • Needs to seek an option that is paid fully by many insurance companies;

    while many insurance companies will partially pay for some addiction treatment, most will cover this option fully.

    • Need a lower cost solution for their treatment needs

    Intensive Outpatient

    If you have the need to live at home, have already completed a residential treatment program and would like additional recovery support, or if you don’t require a medically-supervised detox, then you may be a good candidate for an intensive outpatient program (IOP).

    IOP meetings are typically scheduled for 2 to 4 hour sessions 3 days per week. They are flexible enough to be held outside work or school schedules and are often offered during the day as well as in the evenings. The focus of IOP treatment is to help a person get sober, stay sober, and avoid relapse. After identifying any psychological problems and the underlying reasons that may contribute to substance abuse, counselors help attendees improve coping and problem-solving skills, implement positive lifestyle changes, develop a positive support network, and get involved with support systems in the community.

    Outpatient Treatment

    When people think about outpatient treatment, the primary consideration they have is the need to remain in their home, whether this is due to care-giving responsibilities, work, or other obligations. It is often the case that when making a decision about outpatient treatment, many people tend to compare the services available at an inpatient treatment option against the services available at an outpatient treatment option.

    In actuality, many of the comprehensive addiction treatment services are available in both inpatient and outpatient treatment programs. One differentiator is that while both program types focus on family support and involvement, outpatient treatment patients can immediately begin applying the lessons learned from outpatient treatment programs to their daily life experiences.

    Aftercare

    The successful result of an addiction treatment program is that a person is no longer drug addicted. To ensure ongoing success, aftercare is critical for relapse avoidance. The most common options for aftercare services are:

    • Outpatient treatment
    • Individual therapy
    • Sober living
    • 12-step support groups

    It is important to think of aftercare as just one aspect of the continuum of treatment to ensure that people live a drug-free lifestyle for the rest of their lives. Assuredly, this is a long-term commitment and these aftercare solutions provide great support.

    Sober Living

    Sober living is a viable option for many people as an aftercare solution. The mandate of a sober living home is that they are free of alcohol and drugs for individuals in recovery. In most cases, people who reside in a sober living home pay the costs and maintain the home by contributing to the upkeep of the house through rent and chores.

    Whether the home is owned by a business, religious group, or privately-owned, there are several benefits inherent in choosing a sober living home including:

    • Sober living has been shown to enhance abstinence. People in sober living encourage ongoing treatment even going so far as to go to support group meetings together.
    • Sober living has built-in understanding and support. The people who you live with in this environment understand, know, and have lived with experiences similar to yours. Not only do your housemates understand but are also in need of your reciprocated support. This mutually beneficial relationship can have a strong impact on your ability to avoid relapse.
    • Sober living offers accountability. Everyone who has participated in drug treatment wants to stay sober, but the relapse rate being so high indicates how difficult this goal is. Living with people who hold you accountable for your sobriety is a powerful recovery tool.

    It is often difficult to go directly from treatment back to your lifestyle. Sober living can give you a safe place to “dip your toes” back into the real-world lifestyle.